How to Get Started With Jetson Nano

This section describes how to flash, install wireless connectivity, and run Isaac SDK sample applications on the Jetson Nano device. To get started with Nano in general, from the very beginning, see Getting Started with Jetson Nano Developer Kit.

How to Flash Jetson Nano

Nano can be flashed in two ways:

Use those documents to determine the best method for your use case.

Connecting a Wi-Fi/Bluetooth Card

The Intel 8265 is used for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity. Use the following steps to install a Wi-Fi/Bluetooth card for Jetson Nano.

  1. To access the M.2 slot on the carrier board, remove the two screws on the side and open the SODIMM latches using both your hands.

    ../../../_images/nano-wifi-1.jpg
  2. When the Jetson Nano module pops up, slide it out gently.

    ../../../_images/nano-wifi-2.jpg
  3. Take out the Intel wireless card, attach antenna on its U.FL sockets before inserting the card to the M.2 socket. Attaching the antena on the sockets requires a patience and getting used to. Use your nail to gently apply a force. You don’t need that much force to clamp that in once you are in the right position.

    ../../../_images/nano-wifi-3.jpg
  4. Slide the Intel 8265 card into the socket.

    ../../../_images/nano-wifi-3.jpg
  5. Fix the Intel 8265 card in place with a screw, and replace the Jeston Nano module. Make sure to use the correct screws in each case.

    ../../../_images/nano-wifi-4.jpg

Getting the IP Address

Obtain the IP address of Jetson Nano with the following steps:

  1. If necessary, connect a keyboard, mouse, and display, and boot the device as shown in the Setup and First Boot section of Getting Started with Jetson Nano Developer Kit.

  2. At a terminal prompt, enter the following command:

    bob@jetson:~/$ ip addr show
    

Sample Applications to Run on Jetson Nano

This section describes the steps to run two sample applications on Jetson Nano. The first does not require any peripherals. The second one is a more useful application that requires a camera to be connected.

Other applications can be also deployed and run using the methods described here.

Ping

  1. On the host system where the Isaac SDK is installed, start by typing the following on your host machine with Isaac SDK.
bob@desktop:~/isaac$ /engine/build/deploy.sh -d jetpack42 -h <nano_ip> -p //apps/tutorials/ping:ping-pkg

You might need to use the –remote-user USER flag if the user name on the robot is not nvidia.

  1. Change to the directory on your Jetson Nano and run the application with the following commands:
bob@jetson:~/$ cd deploy/bob/ping-pkg/
bob@jetson:~/deploy/bob/ping-pkg$ ./apps/tutorials/ping/ping

Where “bob” is your username on the host system. You should see “Hello World!” being printed every 1.5 seconds.

OpenCV Edge Detection

  1. For this sample, connect a camera to one of the USB ports on the Jetson Nano.
  2. On the host system where the Isaac SDK is installed, type the following command:
bob@jetson:~/isaac$ ./engine/build/deploy.sh -d jetpack42 -h <nano_ip> -p //apps/tutorials/opencv_edge_detection:opencv_edge_detection-pkg

You might need to use the –remote-user USER flag if the user name on the robot is not nvidia.

  1. Change to the directory on your Jetson Nano and run the application with the following commands:
bob@jetson:~/$ cd deploy/bob/opencv_edge_detection-pkg/
bob@jetson:~/deploy/bob/opencv_edge_detection-pkg/$ ./apps/tutorials/opencv_edge_detection/opencv_edge_detection
  1. To view the results, load http://<nano_ip>:3000/ in your browser. Make sure that the application is running when you are loading the webpage.