OVS Offload Using ASAP2 Direct

1.0

Open vSwitch (OVS) allows Virtual Machines (VM) to communicate with each other and with the outside world. OVS traditionally resides in the hypervisor and switching is based on twelve tuple matching on flows. The OVS software based solution is CPU intensive, affecting system performance and preventing full utilization of the available bandwidth. The current OVS supported is OVS running in Linux Kernel.
Mellanox Accelerated Switching And Packet Processing (ASAP2) technology allows OVS offloading by handling OVS data-plane in Mellanox ConnectX-5 onwards NIC hardware (Mellanox Embedded Switch or eSwitch) while maintaining OVS control-plane unmodified. As a result, we observe significantly higher OVS performance without the associated CPU load.
The current actions supported by ASAP2 include packet parsing and matching, forward, drop along with VLAN push/pop or VXLAN encapsulation/decapsulation.

Install the required packages. For the complete solution, you need to install supporting MLNX_OFED (v4.4 and above), iproute2, and openvswitch packages.

To set up SR-IOV:

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  1. Choose the desired card.

    The example below shows a dual-ported ConnectX-5 card (device ID 0x1017) and a single SR-IOV VF (Virtual Function, device ID 0x1018).

    In SR-IOV terms, the card itself is referred to as the PF (Physical Function).

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    # lspci -nn | grep Mellanox   0a:00.0 Ethernet controller [0200]: Mellanox Technologies MT27800 Family [ConnectX-5] [15b3:1017] 0a:00.1 Ethernet controller [0200]: Mellanox Technologies MT27800 Family [ConnectX-5] [15b3:1017]   0a:00.2 Ethernet controller [0200]: Mellanox Technologies MT27800 Family [ConnectX-5 Virtual Function] [15b3:1018]

    Warning

    Enabling SR-IOV and creating VFs is done by the firmware upon admin directive as explained in Step 5 below.

  2. Identify the Mellanox NICs and locate net-devices which are on the NIC PCI BDF.

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    # ls -l /sys/class/net/ | grep 04:00   lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 16:58 enp4s0f0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:03.0/0000:04:00.0/net/enp4s0f0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 16:58 enp4s0f1 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:03.0/0000:04:00.1/net/enp4s0f1 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 16:58 eth0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:03.0/0000:04:00.2/net/eth0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 16:58 eth1 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:03.0/0000:04:00.3/net/eth1

    The PF NIC for port #1 is enp4s0f0, and the rest of the commands will be issued on it.

  3. Check the firmware version.
    Make sure the firmware versions installed are as state in the Release Notes document.

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    # ethtool -i enp4s0f0 | head -5 driver: mlx5_core version: 5.0-5  firmware-version: 16.21.0338 expansion-rom-version: bus-info: 0000:04:00.0

  4. Make sure SR-IOV is enabled on the system (server, card).
    Make sure SR-IOV is enabled by the server BIOS, and by the firmware with up to N VFs, where N is the number of VFs required for your environment. Refer to "Mellanox Firmware Tools" below for more details.

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    # cat /sys/class/net/enp4s0f0/device/sriov_totalvfs 4

  5. Turn ON SR-IOV on the PF device.

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    # echo 2 > /sys/class/net/enp4s0f0/device/sriov_numvfs

  6. Provision the VF MAC addresses using the IP tool.

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    # ip link set enp4s0f0 vf 0 mac e4:11:22:33:44:50 # ip link set enp4s0f0 vf 1 mac e4:11:22:33:44:51

  7. Verify the VF MAC addresses were provisioned correctly and SR-IOV was turned ON.

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    # cat /sys/class/net/enp4s0f0/device/sriov_numvfs 2   # ip link show dev enp4s0f0 256: enp4s0f0: <BROADCAST,MULTICAST,UP,LOWER_UP> mtu 1500 qdisc mq master ovs-system state UP mode DEFAULT group default qlen 1000 link/ether e4:1d:2d:60:95:a0 brd ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff vf 0 MAC e4:11:22:33:44:50, spoof checking off, link-state auto vf 1 MAC e4:11:22:33:44:51, spoof checking off, link-state auto

    In the example above, the maximum number of possible VFs supported by the firmware is 4 and only 2 are enabled.

  8. Provision the PCI VF devices to VMs using PCI Pass-Through or any other preferred virt tool of choice, e.g virt-manager.

For further information on SR-IOV, refer to https://support.mellanox.com/docs/DOC-2386.

Configuring Uplink Representor Mode

Warning

Please note that this step is optional. However, if you wish to configure uplink representor mode, make sure this step is performed before configuring SwitchDev.

The following are the uplink representor modes available for configuration

  • new_netdev: default mode - when found in this mode, the uplink representor is created as a new netdevice

  • nic_netdev: when found in this mode, the NIC netdevice acts as an uplink representor device

Example:

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echo nic_netdev > /sys/class/net/ens1f0/compat/devlink/uplink_rep_mode

Notes:

  • The mode can only be changed when found in Legacy mode

  • The mode is not saved when reloading mlx5_core

  • When two PFs in the same bonding device need to enter the SwitchDev mode, the uplink representor mode for both PFs should be same (either nic_netdev or new_netdev)

Configuring SwitchDev

  1. Unbind the VFs.

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    echo 0000:04:00.2 > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/mlx5_core/unbind echo 0000:04:00.3 > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/mlx5_core/unbind

    Warning

    VMs with attached VFs must be powered off to be able to unbind the VFs.

  2. Change the e-switch mode from legacy to switchdev on the PF device.
    This will also create the VF representor netdevices in the host OS.

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    # echo switchdev > /sys/class/net/enp4s0f0/compat/devlink/mode

    Warning

    Before changing the mode, make sure that all VFs are unbound.

    Warning

    To go back to SR-IOV legacy mode:
    # echo legacy > /sys/class/net/enp4s0f0/compat/devlink/mode
    Running this command, will also remove the VF representor netdevices.

  3. Set the network VF representor device names to be in the form of $PF_$VFID where $PF is the PF netdev name, and $VFID is the VF ID=0,1,[..], either by:
    * Using this rule in /etc/udev/rules.d/82-net-setup-link.rules

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    SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", ATTR{phys_switch_id}=="e41d2d60971d", \ ATTR{phys_port_name}!="", NAME="enp4s0f1_$attr{phys_port_name}" 

    Replace the phys_switch_id value ("e41d2d60971d" above) with the value matching your switch, as obtained from:

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    ip -d link show enp4s0f1

    Example output of device names when using the udev rule:

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    ls -l /sys/class/net/ens4* lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 17:14 enp4s0f0 -> ../../devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:03.0/0000:04:00.0/net/enp4s0f0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 17:15 enp4s0f0_0 -> ../../devices/virtual/net/enp4s0f0_0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Mar 27 17:15 enp4s0f0_1 -> ../../devices/virtual/net/enp4s0f0_1

    * Using the supplied 82-net-setup-link.rules and vf-net-link-name.sh script to set the VF representor device names.
    From the scripts directory copy vf-net-link-name.sh to /etc/udev/ and 82-net-setup-link.rules to /etc/udev/rules.d/.
    Make sure vf-net-link-name.sh is executable.

  4. Run the openvswitch service.

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    # systemctl start openvswitch

  5. Create an OVS bridge (here it's named ovs-sriov).

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    # ovs-vsctl add-br ovs-sriov

  6. Enable hardware offload (disabled by default).

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    # ovs-vsctl set Open_vSwitch . other_config:hw-offload=true

  7. Restart the openvswitch service. This step is required for HW offload changes to take effect.

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    # systemctl restart openvswitch

    Warning

    HW offload policy can also be changed by setting the tc-policy using one on the following values:

    * none - adds a TC rule to both the software and the hardware (default)

    * skip_sw - adds a TC rule only to the hardware

    * skip_hw - adds a TC rule only to the software

    The above change is used for debug purposes.

  8. Add the PF and the VF representor netdevices as OVS ports.

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    # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0 # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0_0 # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0_1

    Make sure to bring up the PF and representor netdevices.

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    # ip link set dev enp4s0f0 up # ip link set dev enp4s0f0_0 up # ip link set dev enp4s0f0_1 up

    The PF represents the uplink (wire).

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    # ovs-dpctl show system@ovs-system: lookups: hit:0 missed:192 lost:1 flows: 2 masks: hit:384 total:2 hit/pkt:2.00 port 0: ovs-system (internal) port 1: ovs-sriov (internal) port 2: enp4s0f0 port 3: enp4s0f0_0 port 4: enp4s0f0_1

  9. Run traffic from the VFs and observe the rules added to the OVS data-path.

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    # ovs-dpctl dump-flows   recirc_id(0),in_port(3),eth(src=e4:11:22:33:44:50,dst=e4:1d:2d:a5:f3:9d), eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(frag=no), packets:33, bytes:3234, used:1.196s, actions:2   recirc_id(0),in_port(2),eth(src=e4:1d:2d:a5:f3:9d,dst=e4:11:22:33:44:50), eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(frag=no), packets:34, bytes:3332, used:1.196s, actions:3

    In the example above, the ping was initiated from VF0 (OVS port 3) to the outer node (OVS port 2), where the VF MAC is e4:11:22:33:44:50 and the outer node MAC is e4:1d:2d:a5:f3:9d
    As shown above, two OVS rules were added, one in each direction.
    Note that you can also verify offloaded packets using by adding type=offloaded to the command. For example:

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    # ovs-dpctl dump-flows type=offloaded

Flow Statistics and Aging

The aging timeout of OVS is given is ms and can be controlled with this command:

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# ovs-vsctl set Open_vSwitch . other_config:max-idle=30000


Offloading VLANs

It is common to require the VM traffic to be tagged by the OVS. Such that, the OVS adds tags (vlan push) to the packets sent by the VMs and strips (vlan pop) the packets received for this VM from other nodes/VMs.
To do so, add a tag=$TAG section for the OVS command line that adds the representor ports, for example here we use vlan ID 52.

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# ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0 # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0_0 tag=52 # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0_1 tag=52

The PF port should not have a VLAN attached. This will cause OVS to add VLAN push/pop actions when managing traffic for these VFs.
To see how the OVS rules look with vlans, here we initiated a ping from VF0 (OVS port 3) to an outer node (OVS port 2), where the VF MAC is e4:11:22:33:44:50 and the outer node MAC is 00:02:c9:e9:bb:b2.

At this stage, we can see that two OVS rules were added, one in each direction.

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recirc_id(0),in_port(3),eth(src=e4:11:22:33:44:50,dst=00:02:c9:e9:bb:b2),eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(frag=no), \ packets:0, bytes:0, used:never, actions:push_vlan(vid=52,pcp=0),2   recirc_id(0),in_port(2),eth(src=00:02:c9:e9:bb:b2,dst=e4:11:22:33:44:50),eth_type(0x8100), \ vlan(vid=52,pcp=0),encap(eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(frag=no)), packets:0, bytes:0, used:never, actions:pop_vlan,3

  • For outgoing traffic (in port = 3), the actions are push vlan (52) and forward to port 2

  • For incoming traffic (in port = 2), matching is done also on vlan, and the actions are pop vlan and forward to port 3

Offloading VXLAN Encapsulation/Decapsulation Actions

Warning

VXLAN encapsulation / decapsulation offloading of OVS actions is supported only in ConnectX-5 adapter cards.

In case of offloading VXLAN, the PF should not be added as a port in the OVS data-path but rather be assigned with the IP address to be used for encapsulation.

The example below shows two hosts (PFs) with IPs 1.1.1.177 and 1.1.1.75, where the PF device on both hosts is enp4s0f0 and the VXLAN tunnel is set with VNID 98:

  • On the first host:

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    # ip addr add 1.1.1.177/24 dev enp4s0f1   # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov vxlan0 -- set interface vxlan0 type=vxlan options:local_ip=1.1.1.177 options:remote_ip=1.1.1.75 options:key=98

  • On the second host:

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    # ip addr add 1.1.1.75/24 dev enp4s0f1   # ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov vxlan0 -- set interface vxlan0 type=vxlan options:local_ip=1.1.1.75 options:remote_ip=1.1.1.177 options:key=98

When encapsulating guest traffic, the VF’s device MTU must be reduced to allow the host/HW add the encap headers without fragmenting the resulted packet. As such, the VF’s MTU must be lowered to 1450 for IPv4 and 1430 for IPv6.
To see how the OVS rules look with vxlan encap/decap actions, here we initiated a ping from a VM on the 1st host whose MAC is e4:11:22:33:44:50 to a VM on the 2nd host whose MAC is 46:ac:d1:f1:4c:af
At this stage we see that two OVS rules were added to the first host; one in each direction.

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# ovs-dpctl show system@ovs-system: lookups: hit:7869 missed:241 lost:2 flows: 2 masks: hit:13726 total:10 hit/pkt:1.69 port 0: ovs-system (internal) port 1: ovs-sriov (internal) port 2: vxlan_sys_4789 (vxlan) port 3: enp4s0f1_0 port 4: enp4s0f1_1     # ovs-dpctl dump-flows   recirc_id(0),in_port(3),eth(src=e4:11:22:33:44:50,dst=46:ac:d1:f1:4c:af),eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(tos=0/0x3,frag=no), packets:4, bytes:392, used:0.664s, actions:set(tunnel(tun_id=0x62,dst=1.1.1.75,ttl=64,flags(df,key))),2   recirc_id(0),tunnel(tun_id=0x62,src=1.1.1.75,dst=1.1.1.177,ttl=64,flags(-df-csum+key)), in_port(2),skb_mark(0),eth(src=46:ac:d1:f1:4c:af,dst=e4:11:22:33:44:50),eth_type(0x0800),ipv4(frag=no), packets:5, bytes:490, used:0.664s, actions:3

  • For outgoing traffic (in port = 3), the actions are set vxlan tunnel to host 1.1.1.75 (encap) and forward to port 2

  • For incoming traffic (in port = 2), matching is done also on vxlan tunnel info which was decapsulated, and the action is forward to port 3

Manually Adding TC Rules

Offloading rules can also be added directly, and not just through OVS, using the tc utility.
To enable TC ingress on both the PF and the VF.

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# tc qdisc add dev enp4s0f0 ingress # tc qdisc add dev enp4s0f0_0 ingress # tc qdisc add dev enp4s0f0_1 ingress

Examples

L2 Rule

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# tc filter add dev ens4f0_0 protocol ip parent ffff: \ flower \ skip_sw \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ src_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ action drop


VLAN Rule

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# tc filter add dev ens4f0_0 protocol 802.1Q parent ffff: \ flower \ skip_sw \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ src_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ action vlan push id 100 \ action mirred egress redirect dev ens4f0   # tc filter add dev ens4f0 protocol 802.1Q parent ffff: \ flower \ skip_sw \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ src_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ vlan_ethtype 0x800 \ vlan_id 100 \ vlan_prio 0 \ action vlan pop \ action mirred egress redirect dev ens4f0_0


VXLAN Rule

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# tc filter add dev ens4f0_0 protocol 0x806 parent ffff: \ flower \ skip_sw \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ src_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ action tunnel_key set \ src_ip 20.1.12.1 \ dst_ip 20.1.11.1 \ id 100 \ action mirred egress redirect dev vxlan100   # tc filter add dev vxlan100 protocol 0x806 parent ffff: \ flower \ skip_sw \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ src_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ enc_src_ip 20.1.11.1 \ enc_dst_ip 20.1.12.1 \ enc_key_id 100 \ enc_dst_port 4789 \ action tunnel_key unset \ action mirred egress redirect dev ens4f0_0

Bond Rule

Bond rules can be added in one of the following methods:

  • Using shared block (requires kernel support):

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    # tc qdisc add dev bond0 ingress_block 22 ingress # tc qdisc add dev ens4p0 ingress_block 22 ingress # tc qdisc add dev ens4p1 ingress_block 22 ingress

    • Add drop rule:

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      # tc filter add block 22 protocol arp parent ffff: prio 3 \ flower \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:51 \ action drop

    • Add redirect rule from bond to representor:

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      # tc filter add block 22 protocol arp parent ffff: prio 3 \ flower \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ action mirred egress redirect dev ens4f0_0

    • Add redirect rule from representor to bond:

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      # tc filter add dev ens4f0_0 protocol arp parent ffff: prio 3 \ flower \ dst_mac ec:0d:9a:8a:28:42 \ action mirred egress redirect dev bond0

  • Without using shared block:

    • Add redirect rule from bond to representor:

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      # tc filter add dev bond0 protocol arp parent ffff: prio 1 \ flower \ dst_mac e4:11:22:11:4a:50 \ action mirred egress redirect dev ens4f0_0

    • Add redirect rule from representor to bond:

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      # tc filter add dev ens4f0_0 protocol arp parent ffff: prio 3 \ flower \ dst_mac ec:0d:9a:8a:28:42 \ action mirred egress redirect dev bond0

VLAN Modify

VLAN Modify rules can be added in one of the following methods:

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tc filter add dev $REP_DEV1 protocol 802.1q ingress prio 1 flower \ vlan_id 10 \ action vlan modify id 11 pipe \ action mirred egress redirect dev $REP_DEV2

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tc filter add dev $DEV_REP1 protocol 802.1q ingress prio 1 flower \ vlan_id 10 \ action vlan pop pipe action vlan push id 11 pipe \ action mirred egress redirect dev $REP_DEV2

SR-IOV VF LAG

SR-IOV VF LAG allows the NIC’s physical functions (PFs) to get the rules that the OVS will try to offload to the bond net-device, and to offload them to the hardware e-switch. Bond modes supported are:

  • Active-Backup

  • XOR

  • LACP

SR-IOV VF LAG enables complete offload of the LAG functionality to the hardware. The bonding creates a single bonded PF port. Packets from up-link can arrive from any of the physical ports, and will be forwarded to the bond device.

When hardware offload is used, packets from both ports can be forwarded to any of the VFs. Traffic from the VF can be forwarded to both ports according to the bonding state. Meaning, when in active-backup mode, only one PF is up, and traffic from any VF will go through this PF. When in XOR or LACP mode, if both PFs are up, traffic from any VF will split between these two PFs.

SR-IOV VF LAG Configuration on ASAP2

To enable SR-IOV LAG, both physical functions of the NIC should first be configured to SR-IOV switchdev mode, and only afterwards bond the up-link representors.
The example below shows the creation of bond interface on two PFs:

  1. Load bonding device and enslave the up-link representor (currently PF) net-device devices.

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    modprobe bonding mode=802.3ad Ifup bond0 (make sure ifcfg file is present with desired bond configuration) ip link set enp4s0f0 master bond0 ip link set enp4s0f1 master bond0

  2. Add the VF representor net-devices as OVS ports. If tunneling is not used, add the bond device as well.

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    ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov bond0 ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f0_0 ovs-vsctl add-port ovs-sriov enp4s0f1_0

  3. Make sure to bring up the PF and the representor netdevices.

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    ip link set dev bond0 up ip link set dev enp4s0f0_0 up ip link set dev enp4s0f1_0 up

Port Mirroring (Flow Based VF Traffic Mirroring for ASAP²)

Warning

Port Mirroring is currently supported in ConnectX-5 adapter cards only.

Unlike para-virtual configurations, when the VM traffic is offloaded to the hardware via SRIOV VF, the host side Admin cannot snoop the traffic (e.g. for monitoring).
ASAP² uses the existing mirroring support in OVS and TC along with the enhancement to the offloading logic in the driver to allow mirroring the VF traffic to another VF.
The mirrored VF can be used to run traffic analyzer (tcpdump, wireshark, etc) and observe the traffic of the VF being mirrored.
The example below shows the creation of port mirror on the following configuration:

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# ovs-vsctl show 09d8a574-9c39-465c-9f16-47d81c12f88a Bridge br-vxlan Port "enp4s0f0_1" Interface "enp4s0f0_1" Port "vxlan0" Interface "vxlan0" type: vxlan options: {key="100", remote_ip="192.168.1.14"} Port "enp4s0f0_0" Interface "enp4s0f0_0" Port "enp4s0f0_2" Interface "enp4s0f0_2" Port br-vxlan Interface br-vxlan type: internal ovs_version: "2.8.90"

  • If we want to set enp4s0f0_0 as the mirror port, and mirror all of the traffic, set it as follow:

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    # ovs-vsctl -- --id=@p get port enp4s0f0_0 \ -- --id=@m create mirror name=m0 select-all=true output-port=@p \ -- set bridge br-vxlan mirrors=@m

  • If we want to set enp4s0f0_0 as the mirror port, and only mirror the traffic, the destination is enp4s0f0_1, set it as follow:

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    # ovs-vsctl -- --id=@p1 get port enp4s0f0_0 \ -- --id=@p2 get port enp4s0f0_1 \ -- --id=@m create mirror name=m0 select-dst-port=@p2 output-port=@p1 \ -- set bridge br-vxlan mirrors=@m

  • If we want to set enp4s0f0_0 as the mirror port, and only mirror the traffic the source is enp4s0f0_1, set it as follow:

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    # ovs-vsctl -- --id=@p1 get port enp4s0f0_0 \ -- --id=@p2 get port enp4s0f0_1 \ -- --id=@m create mirror name=m0 select-src-port=@p2 output-port=@p1 \ -- set bridge br-vxlan mirrors=@m

  • If we want to set enp4s0f0_0 as the mirror port and mirror, all the traffic on enp4s0f0_1, set it as follow:

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    # ovs-vsctl -- --id=@p1 get port enp4s0f0_0 \ -- --id=@p2 get port enp4s0f0_1 \ -- --id=@m create mirror name=m0 select-dst-port=@p2 select-src-port=@p2 output-port=@p1 \ -- set bridge br-vxlan mirrors=@m

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# ovs-vsctl clear bridge br-vxlan mirrors

Performance Tuning Based on Traffic Patterns

Offloaded flows (including connection tracking) are added to virtual switch FDB flow tables. FDB tables have a set of flow groups. Each flow group saves the same traffic pattern flows. For example, for connection tracking offloaded flow, TCP and UDP are different traffic patterns which end up in two different flow groups.

A flow group has a limited size to save flow entries. By default, the driver has 4 big FDB flow groups. Each of these big flow groups can save at most 4000000/(4+1)=800k different 5-tuple flow entries. For scenarios with more than 4 traffic patterns, the driver provides a module parameter (num_of_groups) to allow customization and performance tune.

The size of each big flow group can be calculated according to the following formula.

Warning

size = 4000000/(num_of_groups+1)

To change the number of big FDB flow groups, run:

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$ echo <num_of_groups> > /sys/module/mlx5_core/parameters/num_of_groups

The change takes effect immediately if there is no flow inside the FDB table (no traffic running and all offloaded flows are aged out), and it can be dynamically changed without reloading the driver.

The module parameter can be set statically in /etc/modprobe.d/mlnx.conf file. This way the administrator will not be required to set it via sysfs each time the driver is reloaded.

If there are residual offloaded flows when changing this parameter, then the new configuration only takes effect after all flows age out.

Warning

Note that the default value of num_of_groups may change per MLNX_OFED driver version. The following table lists the values that must be set when upgrading the MLNX_OFED version prior to driver load, in order to achieve the same OOB experience.

MLNX_OFED Version

num_of_groups Default Value

v4.7-3.2.9.0

4

v4.6-3.1.9.0.14

15

v4.6-3.1.9.0.15

15

v4.5-1.0.1.0.19

63


  1. Download and install the MFT package corresponding to your computer’s operating system. You would need the kernel-devel or kernel-headers RPM before the tools are built and installed.
    The package is available at http://www.mellanox.com => Products => Software => Firmware Tools.

  2. Start the mst driver.

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    # mst start Starting MST (Mellanox Software Tools) driver set Loading MST PCI module - Success Loading MST PCI configuration module - Success Create devices

  3. Show the devices status.

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    ST modules: ------------ MST PCI module loaded MST PCI configuration module loaded   PCI devices: ------------ DEVICE_TYPE MST PCI RDMA NET NUMA ConnectX4lx(rev:0) /dev/mst/mt4117_pciconf0.1 04:00.1 net-enp4s0f1 NA ConnectX4lx(rev:0) /dev/mst/mt4117_pciconf0 04:00.0 net-enp4s0f0 NA     # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4117_pciconf0 q | head -16   Device #1: ----------   Device type: ConnectX4lx PCI device: /dev/mst/mt4117_pciconf0   Configurations: Current SRIOV_EN True(1) NUM_OF_VFS 8 PF_LOG_BAR_SIZE 5 VF_LOG_BAR_SIZE 5 NUM_PF_MSIX 63 NUM_VF_MSIX 11 LINK_TYPE_P1 ETH(2) LINK_TYPE_P2 ETH(2)

  4. Make sure your configuration is as follows:

    * SR-IOV is enabled (SRIOV_EN=1)
    * The number of enabled VFs is enough for your environment (NUM_OF_VFS=N)
    * The port’s link type is Ethernet (LINK_TYPE_P1/2=2) when applicable
    If this is not the case, use mlxconfig to enable that, as follows:

    1. Enable SR-IOV.

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      # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 s SRIOV_EN=1

    2. Set the number of required VFs.

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      # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 s NUM_OF_VFS=8 

    3. Set the link type to Ethernet.

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      # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 s LINK_TYPE_P1=2 # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 s LINK_TYPE_P2=2

  5. Reset the firmware.

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    # mlxfwreset -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 reset

  6. Query the firmware to make sure everything is set correctly.

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    # mlxconfig -d /dev/mst/mt4115_pciconf0 q

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