Virtual GPU Software R390 for Linux with KVM Release Notes

Release information for all users of NVIDIA virtual GPU software and hardware on supported Linux with KVM hypervisors.

1. Release Notes

These Release Notes summarize current status, information on validated platforms, and known issues with NVIDIA vGPU software and associated hardware on Linux with KVM.

The releases in this release family of NVIDIA vGPU software include the software listed in the following table:

Software 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4
NVIDIA Virtual GPU Manager for the Linux with KVM releases listed in Hypervisor Software Releases Not supported Not supported 390.72 390.94 390.113
NVIDIA Windows driver Not supported Not supported 391.81 392.05 392.37
NVIDIA Linux driver Not supported Not supported 390.75 390.96 390.115

All releases of NVIDIA vGPU software are compatible with all releases of the license server.

1.1. Updates in Release 6.2

New Features in Release 6.2

  • New -2B4 vGPU type, which supports up to four displays at resolutions up to 2560×1600 for each supported GPU
  • Relaxation of restrictions on unlicensed vGPUs to allow screen resolutions higher than 1280×1024
  • Miscellaneous bug fixes

1.2. Updates in Release 6.3

New Features in Release 6.3

  • Inclusion of the name and version of the licensed product in logged license acquisition events
  • Ability to disable pop-up notifications for license state changes
  • Miscellaneous bug fixes

1.3. Updates in Release 6.4

New Features in Release 6.4

2. Validated Platforms

This release family of NVIDIA vGPU software provides support for several NVIDIA GPUs on validated server hardware platforms, Linux with KVM hypervisor software versions, and guest operating systems. It also supports the version of NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit that is compatible with R390 drivers.

2.1. Supported NVIDIA GPUs and Validated Server Platforms

For information about supported NVIDIA GPUs and the validated server hardware platforms on which they run, consult the documentation from your hypervisor vendor.

Note:

Tesla M60 and M6 GPUs support compute mode and graphics mode. NVIDIA vGPU requires GPUs that support both modes to operate in graphics mode.

Recent Tesla M60 GPUs and M6 GPUs are supplied in graphics mode. However, your GPU might be in compute mode if it is an older Tesla M60 GPU or M6 GPU, or if its mode has previously been changed.

To configure the mode of Tesla M60 and M6 GPUs, use the gpumodeswitch tool provided with NVIDIA vGPU software releases.

2.2. Hypervisor Software Releases

NVIDIA vGPU software supports only Linux with KVM hypervisor software from the vendors listed in the table. The table indicates the specific releases of NVIDIA vGPU software that each vendor supports.

Hypervisor Vendor 6.2 6.3 6.4
H3C -
Huawei - -
Sangfor -

✓ Release is supported.

- Release is not supported.

2.3. Guest OS Support

For information about Windows releases and Linux distributions supported as a guest OS, consult the documentation from your hypervisor vendor.

Note:

Use only a guest OS release that is listed as supported by NVIDIA vGPU software with your virtualization software. To be listed as supported, a guest OS release must be supported not only by NVIDIA vGPU software, but also by your virtualization software. NVIDIA cannot support guest OS releases that your virtualization software does not support.

In pass-through mode, GPUs based on the Pascal architecture or Volta architecture support only 64-bit guest operating systems. No 32-bit guest operating systems are supported in pass-through mode for these GPUs.

2.4. NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit Version Support

The releases in this release family of NVIDIA vGPU software support NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit 9.1.

For more information about NVIDIA CUDA Toolkit, see CUDA Toolkit 9.1 Documentation.

3. Known Product Limitations

Known product limitations for this release of NVIDIA vGPU software are described in the following sections.

3.1. vGPU profiles with 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer support only 1 virtual display head on Windows 10

Description

To reduce the possibility of memory exhaustion, vGPU profiles with 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer support only 1 virtual display head on a Windows 10 guest OS.

The following vGPU profiles have 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer:

  • Tesla M6-0B, M6-0Q
  • Tesla M10-0B, M10-0Q
  • Tesla M60-0B, M60-0Q

Workaround

Use a profile that supports more than 1 virtual display head and has at least 1 Gbyte of frame buffer.

3.2. NVENC requires at least 1 Gbyte of frame buffer

Description

Using the frame buffer for the NVIDIA hardware-based H.264/HEVC video encoder (NVENC) may cause memory exhaustion with vGPU profiles that have 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer. To reduce the possibility of memory exhaustion, NVENC is disabled on profiles that have 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer. Application GPU acceleration remains fully supported and available for all profiles, including profiles with 512 MBytes or less of frame buffer. NVENC support from both Citrix and VMware is a recent feature and, if you are using an older version, you should experience no change in functionality.

The following vGPU profiles have 512 Mbytes or less of frame buffer:

  • Tesla M6-0B, M6-0Q
  • Tesla M10-0B, M10-0Q
  • Tesla M60-0B, M60-0Q

Workaround

If you require NVENC to be enabled, use a profile that has at least 1 Gbyte of frame buffer.

3.3. VM running older NVIDIA vGPU drivers fails to initialize vGPU when booted

Description

A VM running a version of the NVIDIA guest VM drivers from a previous main release branch, for example release 4.4, will fail to initialize vGPU when booted on a Linux with KVM platform running the current release of Virtual GPU Manager.

In this scenario, the VM boots in standard VGA mode with reduced resolution and color depth. The NVIDIA virtual GPU is present in Windows Device Manager but displays a warning sign, and the following device status:

Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)

Depending on the versions of drivers in use, the Linux with KVM VM’s /var/log/messages log file reports one of the following errors:

  • An error message:
    vmiop_log: error: Unable to fetch Guest NVIDIA driver information
  • A version mismatch between guest and host drivers:
    vmiop_log: error: Guest VGX version(1.1) and Host VGX version(1.2) do not match
  • A signature mismatch:
    vmiop_log: error: VGPU message signature mismatch.

Resolution

Install the current NVIDIA guest VM driver in the VM.

3.4. Virtual GPU fails to start if ECC is enabled

Description

Tesla M60, Tesla M6, and GPUs based on the Pascal GPU architecture, for example Tesla P100 or Tesla P4, support error correcting code (ECC) memory for improved data integrity. Tesla M60 and M6 GPUs in graphics mode are supplied with ECC memory disabled by default, but it may subsequently be enabled using nvidia-smi. GPUs based on the Pascal GPU architecture are supplied with ECC memory enabled.

However, NVIDIA vGPU does not support ECC memory. If ECC memory is enabled, NVIDIA vGPU fails to start.

The following error is logged in the Linux with KVM host’s /var/log/messages log file:

vmiop_log: error: Initialization: VGX not supported with ECC Enabled.

Resolution

Ensure that ECC is disabled on all GPUs.

Before you begin, ensure that NVIDIA Virtual GPU Manager is installed on your hypervisor.

  1. Use nvidia-smi to list the status of all GPUs, and check for ECC noted as enabled on GPUs.
    # nvidia-smi -q
    
    ==============NVSMI LOG==============
    
    Timestamp                           : Tue Dec 19 18:36:45 2017
    Driver Version                      : 384.99
    
    Attached GPUs                       : 1
    GPU 0000:02:00.0
    
    [...]
    
        Ecc Mode
            Current                     : Enabled
            Pending                     : Enabled
    
    [...]
  2. Change the ECC status to off on each GPU for which ECC is enabled.
    • If you want to change the ECC status to off for all GPUs on your host machine, run this command:
      # nvidia-smi -e 0
    • If you want to change the ECC status to off for a specific GPU, run this command:
      # nvidia-smi -i id -e 0

      id is the index of the GPU as reported by nvidia-smi.

      This example disables ECC for the GPU with index 0000:02:00.0.

      # nvidia-smi -i 0000:02:00.0 -e 0
  3. Reboot the host.
  4. Confirm that ECC is now disabled for the GPU.
    # nvidia-smi -q
    
    ==============NVSMI LOG==============
    
    Timestamp                           : Tue Dec 19 18:37:53 2017
    Driver Version                      : 384.99
    
    Attached GPUs                       : 1
    GPU 0000:02:00.0
    [...]
    
        Ecc Mode
            Current                     : Disabled
            Pending                     : Disabled
    
    [...]

If you later need to enable ECC on your GPUs, run one of the following commands:

  • If you want to change the ECC status to on for all GPUs on your host machine, run this command:
    # nvidia-smi -e 1
  • If you want to change the ECC status to on for a specific GPU, run this command:
    # nvidia-smi -i id -e 1

    id is the index of the GPU as reported by nvidia-smi.

    This example enables ECC for the GPU with index 0000:02:00.0.

    # nvidia-smi -i 0000:02:00.0 -e 1

After changing the ECC status to on, reboot the host.

3.5. Single vGPU benchmark scores are lower than pass-through GPU

Description

A single vGPU configured on a physical GPU produces lower benchmark scores than the physical GPU run in pass-through mode.

Aside from performance differences that may be attributed to a vGPU’s smaller frame buffer size, vGPU incorporates a performance balancing feature known as Frame Rate Limiter (FRL). On vGPUs that use the best-effort scheduler, FRL is enabled. On vGPUs that use the fixed share or equal share scheduler, FRL is disabled.

FRL is used to ensure balanced performance across multiple vGPUs that are resident on the same physical GPU. The FRL setting is designed to give good interactive remote graphics experience but may reduce scores in benchmarks that depend on measuring frame rendering rates, as compared to the same benchmarks running on a pass-through GPU.

Resolution

FRL is controlled by an internal vGPU setting. On vGPUs that use the best-effort scheduler, NVIDIA does not validate vGPU with FRL disabled, but for validation of benchmark performance, FRL can be temporarily disabled by setting frame_rate_limiter=0 in the vGPU configuration file.

# echo "frame_rate_limiter=0" > /sys/bus/mdev/devices/vgpu-id/nvidia/vgpu_params

For example:

# echo "frame_rate_limiter=0" > /sys/bus/mdev/devices/aa618089-8b16-4d01-a136-25a0f3c73123/nvidia/vgpu_params

The setting takes effect the next time any VM using the given vGPU type is started.

With this setting in place, the VM’s vGPU will run without any frame rate limit.

The FRL can be reverted back to its default setting as follows:

  1. Clear all parameter settings in the vGPU configuration file.

    # echo " " > /sys/bus/mdev/devices/vgpu-id/nvidia/vgpu_params
    Note: You cannot clear specific parameter settings. If your vGPU configuration file contains other parameter settings that you want to keep, you must reinstate them in the next step.
  2. Set frame_rate_limiter=1 in the vGPU configuration file.

    # echo "frame_rate_limiter=1" > /sys/bus/mdev/devices/vgpu-id/nvidia/vgpu_params

    If you need to reinstate other parameter settings, include them in the command to set frame_rate_limiter=1. For example:

    # echo "frame_rate_limiter=1 disable_vnc=1" > /sys/bus/mdev/devices/aa618089-8b16-4d01-a136-25a0f3c73123/nvidia/vgpu_params

3.6. nvidia-smi fails to operate when all GPUs are assigned to GPU pass-through mode

Description

If all GPUs in the platform are assigned to VMs in pass-through mode, nvidia-smi will return an error:

[root@vgx-test ~]# nvidia-smi
Failed to initialize NVML: Unknown Error

This is because GPUs operating in pass-through mode are not visible to nvidia-smi and the NVIDIA kernel driver operating in the Linux with KVMhost.

To confirm that all GPUs are operating in pass-through mode, confirm that the vfio-pci kernel driver is handling each device.

# lspci -s 05:00.0 -k
05:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation GM204GL [Tesla M60] (rev a1)
               Subsystem: NVIDIA Corporation Device 113a
               Kernel driver in use: vfio-pci

Resolution

N/A

4. Resolved Issues

Only resolved issues that have been previously noted as known issues or had a noticeable user impact are listed. The summary and description for each resolved issue indicate the effect of the issue on NVIDIA vGPU software before the issue was resolved.

Issues Resolved in Release 6.2

Bug ID Summary and Description
2104867

Screen resolution reverts to a lower value after a VM is rebooted

When a VM is booted, the NVIDIA vGPU software graphics driver is initially unlicensed. Screen resolution is limited to a maximum of 1280×1024 until the VM requires a license for NVIDIA vGPU software.

200407382

Benign Calling load_byte_array(tra) messages are logged

In Linux guest VMs, the Calling load_byte_array(tra) messages from the nvidia-gridd daemon are logged in /var/log/syslog.

Issues Resolved in Release 6.3

Bug ID Summary and Description
2194234

The mouse cursor moves slowly when traversing the Windows 10 Start menu

When a user traverses the Windows 10 Start menu with the mouse, highlighting of items on the menu is slow and lags behind the motion of the mouse.

200346607

Licensing pop-up windows contain the text microsoft.explorer.notification

On Windows 10 Creators Update (1703), licensing pop-up windows contain the text microsoft.explorer.notification.

2187717

VMs configured with vGPU fail to power on on servers with 1 TB or more of system memory

Support for vGPU is limited to servers with less than 1 TB of system memory. On servers with 1 TB or more of system memory, VMs configured with vGPU fail to power on. However, support for GPU pass through is not affected by this limitation.

Issues Resolved in Release 6.4

No resolved issues are reported in this release for Linux with KVM.

5. Security Updates

5.1. Since 6.4: Restricting Access to GPU Performance Counters

The NVIDIA graphics driver contains a vulnerability (CVE-2018-6260) that may allow access to application data processed on the GPU through a side channel exposed by the GPU performance counters. To address this vulnerability, update the driver and restrict access to GPU performance counters to allow access only by administrator users and users who need to use CUDA profiling tools.

The GPU performance counters that are affected by this vulnerability are the hardware performance monitors used by the CUDA profiling tools such as CUPTI, Nsight Graphics, and Nsight Compute. These performance counters are exposed on the hypervisor host and in guest VMs only as follows:

  • On the hypervisor host, they are always exposed. However, the Virtual GPU Manager does not access these performance counters and, therefore, is not affected.
  • In Windows and Linux guest VMs, they are exposed only in VMs configured for GPU pass through. They are not exposed in VMs configured for NVIDIA vGPU.

5.1.1. Windows: Restricting Access to GPU Performance Counters for One User by Using NVIDIA Control Panel

Perform this task from the guest VM to which the GPU is passed through.

Ensure that you are running NVIDIA Control Panel version 8.1.950.
  1. Open NVIDIA Control Panel:
    • Right-click on the Windows desktop and select NVIDIA Control Panel from the menu.
    • Open Windows Control Panel and double-click the NVIDIA Control Panel icon.
  2. In NVIDIA Control Panel, select the Manage GPU Performance Counters task in the Developer section of the navigation pane.
  3. Complete the task by following the instructions in the Manage GPU Performance Counters > Developer topic in the NVIDIA Control Panel help.

5.1.2. Windows: Restricting Access to GPU Performance Counters Across an Enterprise by Using a Registry Key

You can use a registry key to restrict access to GPU Performance Counters for all users who log in to a Windows guest VM. By incorporating the registry key information into a script, you can automate the setting of this registry for all Windows guest VMs across your enterprise.

Perform this task from the guest VM to which the GPU is passed through.

CAUTION:
Only enterprise administrators should perform this task. Changes to the Windows registry must be made with care and system instability can result if registry keys are incorrectly set.
  1. Set the RmProfilingAdminOnly Windows registry key to 1.
    [HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\nvlddmkm\Global\NVTweak]
    Value: "RmProfilingAdminOnly"
    Type: DWORD
    Data: 00000001

    The data value 1 restricts access, and the data value 0 allows access, to application data processed on the GPU through a side channel exposed by the GPU performance counters.

  2. Restart the VM.

5.1.3. Linux Guest VMs and Hypervisor Host: Restricting Access to GPU Performance Counters

On systems where unprivileged users don't need to use GPU performance counters, restrict access to these counters to system administrators, namely users with the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability set. By default, the GPU performance counters are not restricted to users with the CAP_SYS_ADMIN capability.

Perform this task from the guest VM to which the GPU is passed through or from your hypervisor host machine.

In Linux guest VMs, this task requires sudo privileges. On your hypervisor host machine, this task must be performed as the root user on the machine.

  1. Log in to the guest VM or open a command shell on your hypervisor host machine.
  2. Set the kernel module parameter NVreg_RestrictProfilingToAdminUsers to 1 by adding this parameter to the /etc/modprobe.d/nvidia.conf file.
    • If you are setting only this parameter, add an entry for it to the /etc/modprobe.d/nvidia.conf file as follows:

      options nvidia NVreg_RegistryDwords="NVreg_RestrictProfilingToAdminUsers=1"
    • If you are setting multiple parameters, set them in a single entry as in the following example:

      options nvidia NVreg_RegistryDwords="RmPVMRL=0x0" "NVreg_RestrictProfilingToAdminUsers=1"

    If the /etc/modprobe.d/nvidia.conf file does not already exist, create it.

  3. Restart the VM or reboot your hypervisor host machine.

6. Known Issues

6.1. Frame capture while the interactive logon message is displayed returns blank screen

Description

Because of a known limitation with NvFBC, a frame capture while the interactive logon message is displayed returns a blank screen.

An NvFBC session can capture screen updates that occur after the session is created. Before the logon message appears, there is no screen update after the message is shown and, therefore, a black screen is returned instead. If the NvFBC session is created after this update has occurred, NvFBC cannot get a frame to capture.

Workaround

Press Enter or wait for the screen to update for NvFBC to capture the frame.

Status

Not a bug

Ref. #

2115733

6.2. Cloned VMs configured with a vGPU type different than the type in the master image fail to start

Description

Cloned VMs configured with a vGPU type different than the type in the master image fail to start.

When a Windows 10 VM is booted, the VM becomes stuck in a loop and alternately displays Getting devices ready: 50% and Preparation in progress.

Workaround

Create one master image for each vGPU type that you want to use. Do not attempt to configure a cloned VM with a vGPU type different than the type in the master image.

Status

Open

Ref. #

2285306

6.3. Upgrading NVIDIA Virtual GPU Manager for Linux KVM from a .run file fails

Description

Upgrading NVIDIA Virtual GPU Manager for Linux KVM from a .run file fails with the following error:

ERROR: An NVIDIA kernel module 'nvidia' appears to already be loaded in your kernel.

Workaround

Stop the nvidia-vgpu-mgr service before upgrading NVIDIA Virtual GPU Manager.

# systemctl stop nvidia-vgpu-mgr

Status

Open

Ref. #

200420325

6.4. 6.1, 6.2 Only: VMs configured with vGPU fail to power on on servers with 1 TB or more of system memory

Description

Support for vGPU is limited to servers with less than 1 TB of system memory. On servers with 1 TB or more of system memory, VMs configured with vGPU fail to power on. However, support for GPU pass through is not affected by this limitation.

This limitation applies only to systems with supported GPUs based on the Maxwell architecture: Tesla M6, Tesla M10, and Tesla M60.

Resolution

  1. Limit the amount of system memory on the server to 1 TB minus 16 GB.

  2. Reboot the server.

If the problem persists, contact your server vendor for the recommended system memory configuration with NVIDIA GPUs.

Status

Resolved in NVIDIA vGPU software release 6.3

Ref. #

2187717

6.5. Even when the scheduling policy is equal share, unequal GPU utilization is reported

Description

When the scheduling policy is equal share, unequal GPU engine utilization can be reported for the vGPUs on the same physical GPU.

For example, GPU engine usage for three P40-8Q vGPUs on a Tesla P40 GPU might be reported as follows:

[root@localhost:~] nvidia-smi vgpu
Wed Jun 27 10:33:18 2018
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| NVIDIA-SMI 390.59                 Driver Version: 390.59                    |
|-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+
| GPU  Name                     | Bus-Id                         | GPU-Util   |
|      vGPU ID    Name          | VM ID    VM Name               | vGPU-Util  |
|===============================+================================+============|
|   0  Tesla P40                | 00000000:81:00.0               |  52%       |
|      2122661    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122682  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |     19%    |
|      2122663    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122692  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |      0%    |
|      2122659    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122664  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |     25%    |
+-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+
|   1  Tesla P40                | 00000000:85:00.0               |  58%       |
|      2122662    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122689  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |      0%    |
|      2122658    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122667  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |     59%    |
|      2122660    GRID P40-8Q   | 2122670  centos7.4-xmpl-211... |      0%    |
+-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+

The vGPU utilization of the vGPU 2122658 is reported as 59%. However, the expected vGPU utilization should not exceed 33%.

This behavior is a result of the mechanism that is used to measure GPU engine utilization.

Status

Open

Ref. #

2175888

6.6. When the scheduling policy is fixed share, GPU utilization is reported as higher than expected

Description

When the scheduling policy is fixed share, GPU engine utilization can be reported as higher than expected for a vGPU.

For example, GPU engine usage for six P40-4Q vGPUs on a Tesla P40 GPU might be reported as follows:

[root@localhost:~] nvidia-smi vgpu
Mon Aug 20 10:33:18 2018
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
| NVIDIA-SMI 390.42                 Driver Version: 390.42                    |
|-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+
| GPU  Name                     | Bus-Id                         | GPU-Util   |
|      vGPU ID    Name          | VM ID    VM Name               | vGPU-Util  |
|===============================+================================+============|
|   0  Tesla P40                | 00000000:81:00.0               |  99%       |
|      85109      GRID P40-4Q   | 85110    win7-xmpl-146048-1    |     32%    |
|      87195      GRID P40-4Q   | 87196    win7-xmpl-146048-2    |     39%    |
|      88095      GRID P40-4Q   | 88096    win7-xmpl-146048-3    |     26%    |
|      89170      GRID P40-4Q   | 89171    win7-xmpl-146048-4    |      0%    |
|      90475      GRID P40-4Q   | 90476    win7-xmpl-146048-5    |      0%    |
|      93363      GRID P40-4Q   | 93364    win7-xmpl-146048-6    |      0%    |
+-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+
|   1  Tesla P40                | 00000000:85:00.0               |   0%       |
+-------------------------------+--------------------------------+------------+

The vGPU utilization of vGPU 85109 is reported as 32%. For vGPU 87195, vGPU utilization is reported as 39%. And for 88095, it is reported as 26%. However, the expected vGPU utilization of any vGPU should not exceed approximately 16.7%.

This behavior is a result of the mechanism that is used to measure GPU engine utilization.

Status

Open

Ref. #

2227591

6.7. Since 6.1: License is not acquired in Windows VMs

Description

When a windows VM configured with a licensed vGPU is started, the VM fails to acquire a license.

Error messages in the following format are written to the NVIDIA service logs:

[000000020.860152600 sec] - [Logging.lib]   ERROR: [nvGridLicensing.FlexUtility] 353@FlexUtility::LogFneError : Error: Failed to add trusted storage. Server URL : license-server-url - 
[1,7E2,2,1[7000003F,0,9B00A7]]
 
System machine type does not match expected machine type..

Workaround

This workaround requires administrator privileges.

  1. Stop the NVIDIA Display Container LS service.
  2. Delete the contents of the folder %SystemDrive%:\Program Files\NVIDIA Corporation\Grid Licensing.
  3. Start the NVIDIA Display Container LS service.

Status

Closed

Ref. #

200407287

6.8. Since 6.1: nvidia-smi reports that vGPU migration is supported on all hypervisors

Description

The command nvidia-smi vgpu -m shows that vGPU migration is supported on all hypervisors, even hypervisors or hypervisor versions that do not support vGPU migration.

Status

Closed

Ref. #

200407230

6.9. Screen resolution reverts to a lower value after a VM is rebooted

Description

When a VM is booted, the NVIDIA vGPU software graphics driver is initially unlicensed. Screen resolution is limited to a maximum of 1280×1024 until the VM requires a license for NVIDIA vGPU software. Because the higher resolutions are not available, the OS falls back to next available resolution in its mode list (for example, 1366×768) even if the resolution for the VM had previously been set to a higher value (for example, 1920×1080). After the license has been acquired, the OS does not attempt to set the resolution to a higher value.

This behavior is the expected behavior for licensed NVIDIA vGPU software products.

Workaround

Manually set the screen resolution to the required higher value after the VM has acquired the NVIDIA vGPU software license.

Status

Resolved in NVIDIA vGPU software release 6.2.

Ref. #

2104867

6.10. Hot plugging and unplugging vCPUs causes a blue-screen crash in Windows VMs

Description

Hot plugging or unplugging vCPUs causes a blue-screen crash in Windows VMs that are running NVIDIA vGPU software graphics drivers.

When the blue-screen crash occurs, one of the following error messages may also be seen:

  • SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION(nvlddmkm.sys)
  • DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL(nvlddmkm.sys)

NVIDIA vGPU software graphics drivers do not support hot plugging and unplugging of vCPUs.

Status

Closed

Ref. #

2101499

6.11. 6.1 Only: Benign Calling load_byte_array(tra) messages are logged

Description

In Linux guest VMs, the following messages from the nvidia-gridd daemon are logged in /var/log/syslog:

May 21 18:36:39 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: Started (657)
May 21 18:36:39 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: Ignore Service Provider Licensing.
May 21 18:36:39 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: Calling load_byte_array(tra)
May 21 18:36:41 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: Acquiring license for GRID vGPU Edition.
May 21 18:36:41 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: Calling load_byte_array(tra)
May 21 18:36:43 test-HVM-domU nvidia-gridd: License acquired successfully. Server URL : http://192.0.2.117:7070/request

Workaround

Ignore these messages as they are benign.

Status

Resolved in NVIDIA vGPU software release 6.2.

Ref. #

200407382

6.12. 6.0-6.2 Only: Licensing pop-up windows contain the text microsoft.explorer.notification

Description

On Windows 10 Creators Update (1703), licensing pop-up windows contain the text microsoft.explorer.notification.

Version

Windows 10 Creators Update (1703)

Status

Resolved in NVIDIA vGPU software release 6.3

Ref. #

200346607

6.13. Luxmark causes a segmentation fault on an unlicensed Linux client

Description

If the Luxmark application is run on a Linux guest VM configured with NVIDIA vGPU that is booted without acquiring a license, a segmentation fault occurs and the application core dumps. The fault occurs when the application cannot allocate a CUDA object on NVIDIA vGPUs where CUDA is disabled. On NVIDIA vGPUs that can support CUDA, CUDA is disabled in unlicensed mode.

Status

Not an NVIDIA bug.

Ref. #

200330956

6.14. Resolution is not updated after a VM acquires a license and is restarted

Description

In a Red Enterprise Linux 7.3 guest VM, an increase in resolution from 1024×768 to 2560×1600 is not applied after a license is acquired and the gridd service is restarted. This issue occurs if the multimonitor parameter is added to the xorg.conf file.

Version

Red Enterprise Linux 7.3

Status

Open

Ref. #

200275925

6.15. NVIDIA vGPU encoder and process utilization counters don't work with Windows Performance Counters

Description

GPU encoder and process utilization counter groups are listed in Windows Performance Counters, but no instances of the counters are available. The counters are disabled by default and must be enabled.

Workaround

Enable the counters by running the following sequence of commands from a command shell:

wmic /namespace:nv path System call enableProcessUtilizationPerfCounter
wmic /namespace:nv path System call enableEncoderSessionsPerfCounter

If you need to disable the counters, run the following sequence of commands from a command shell:

wmic /namespace:nv path System call disableProcessUtilizationPerfCounter
wmic /namespace:nv path System call disableEncoderSessionsPerfCounter

Status

Open

Ref. #

1971698

6.16. A segmentation fault in DBus code causes nvidia-gridd to exit on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS

Description

On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 and 6.9, and CentOS 6.8 and 6.9, a segmentation fault in DBus code causes the nvidia-gridd service to exit.

The nvidia-gridd service uses DBus for communication with NVIDIA X Server Settings to display licensing information through the Manage License page. Disabling the GUI for licensing resolves this issue.

To prevent this issue, the GUI for licensing is disabled by default. You might encounter this issue if you have enabled the GUI for licensing and are using Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 or 6.9, or CentOS 6.8 and 6.9.

Version

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 and 6.9

CentOS 6.8 and 6.9

Status

Open

Ref. #

  • 200358191
  • 200319854
  • 1895945

6.17. No Manage License option available in NVIDIA X Server Settings by default

Description

By default, the Manage License option is not available in NVIDIA X Server Settings. This option is missing because the GUI for licensing on Linux is disabled by default to work around the issue that is described in A segmentation fault in DBus code causes nvidia-gridd to exit on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS.

Workaround

This workaround requires sudo privileges.

Note: Do not use this workaround with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.8 and 6.9 or CentOS 6.8 and 6.9. To prevent a segmentation fault in DBus code from causing the nvidia-gridd service from exiting, the GUI for licensing must be disabled with these OS versions.
  1. If NVIDIA X Server Settings is running, shut it down.
  2. If the /etc/nvidia/gridd.conf file does not already exist, create it by copying the supplied template file /etc/nvidia/gridd.conf.template.

  3. As root, edit the /etc/nvidia/gridd.conf file to set the EnableUI option to TRUE.

  4. Start the nvidia-gridd service.

    # sudo service nvidia-gridd start

When NVIDIA X Server Settings is restarted, the Manage License option is now available.

Status

Open

6.18. Licenses remain checked out when VMs are forcibly powered off

Description

NVIDIA vGPU software licenses remain checked out on the license server when non-persistent VMs are forcibly powered off.

The NVIDIA service running in a VM returns checked out licenses when the VM is shut down. In environments where non-persistent licensed VMs are not cleanly shut down, licenses on the license server can become exhausted. For example, this issue can occur in automated test environments where VMs are frequently changing and are not guaranteed to be cleanly shut down. The licenses from such VMs remain checked out against their MAC address for seven days before they time out and become available to other VMs.

Resolution

If VMs are routinely being powered off without clean shutdown in your environment, you can avoid this issue by shortening the license borrow period. To shorten the license borrow period, set the LicenseInterval configuration setting in your VM image. For details, refer to Virtual GPU Client Licensing User Guide.

Status

Closed

Ref. #

1694975

6.19. VM bug checks after the guest VM driver for Windows 10 RS2 is installed

Description

When the VM is rebooted after the guest VM driver for Windows 10 RS2 is installed, the VM bug checks. When Windows boots, it selects one of the standard supported video modes. If Windows is booted directly with a display that is driven by an NVIDIA driver, for example a vGPU on Citrix XenServer, a blue screen crash occurs.

This issue occurs when the screen resolution is switched from VGA mode to a resolution that is higher than 1920×1200.

Fix

Download and install Microsoft Windows Update KB4020102 from the Microsoft Update Catalog.

Workaround

If you have applied the fix, ignore this workaround.

Otherwise, you can work around this issue until you are able to apply the fix by not using resolutions higher than 1920×1200.

  1. Choose a GPU profile in Citrix XenCenter that does not allow resolutions higher than 1920×1200.
  2. Before rebooting the VM, set the display resolution to 1920×1200 or lower.

Status

Not an NVIDIA bug

Ref. #

200310861

6.20. GNOME Display Manager (GDM) fails to start on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 and CentOS 7.0

Description

GDM fails to start on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 and CentOS 7.0 with the following error:

Oh no! Something has gone wrong!

Workaround

Permanently enable permissive mode for Security Enhanced Linux (SELinux).

  1. As root, edit the /etc/selinux/config file to set SELINUX to permissive.
    SELINUX=permissive
  2. Reboot the system.
    ~]# reboot

For more information, see Permissive Mode in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 SELinux User's and Administrator's Guide.

Status

Not an NVIDIA bug

Ref. #

200167868

Notices

Notice

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OpenCL

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Trademarks

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